Wrecks & Ruins of Innes National Park

Summer holidays are on the horizon and a lot of holidays are being planned involving heading to the beaches and coast to make the most of long hot days ahead. Many in South Australia will look towards Yorke Peninsula and a relaxing break in any one of the many small towns dotted along the coast. If you do visit the peninsula you should plan a journey to the bottom end, and Innes National Park. Innes is a park filled with breathtaking coastal scenery, picture worthy (instagrammable) roads and tracks throughout, wandering wildlife, eye catching wildflowers, accessible shipwrecks and even…a ghost town.

Simply known as Innes to South Australians it’s a fair drive (around 3 hours from Adelaide) to get to the park which is at the ‘toes’ end of Yorke Peninsula but the drive is one of the reasons it appeals to a lot of different visitors. Its remote points give surfers a few wild ocean spots that are renowned for consistent waves, fishers love the beaches where you can catch big salmon and more and for others the scenery is just amazing and will have you stopping the car frequently and trekking off for short walks to be wowed by the water views and sandy beaches.

There are lots of camping areas within the park which you can book online or you can visit the park for a day trip if you’re staying elsewhere on the peninsula. Don’t forget to pack in the fishing rod, walking shoes and camera and prepare to be wowed. On top of all the natural wonders you can also wander through a ghost town – the remains of Inneston where gypsum was once mined and get up close to shipwrecks on Ethel Wreck beach. The wrecks of the Ethel and the boiler from the Ferret lie on the beach and the metal skeleton remains are exposed and loom out of the sand but by how much depends on tidal movement and sand shifts.

 

Entry to the park is $11 per vehicle and you’ll want at least a whole day to explore this beautiful and wild part of the coast.

Happy travels

Glenys